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Why the medical standards the same across the board?

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So I applied and got the letter of doom in the mail --
I completed everything, was told my interview was great -- then I was told I have a medical abnormality. (I personally loved that from the recruiter)

Yes - I have Type I Diabetes, and before everyone you close this topic, and everyone tells me to go pursue something else, or that I am medically unfit to be in the army. I will tell you  that I do not disagree, if I was looking for a physical role or piloting or so on.

What I do not understand is why they would automatically turn down my application for a nurse. I am almost completed nursing school, have amazing grades, and control my diabetes well, unfortunately they never even checked. I understand as a nurse I would be possibly deployed, but circumstances of nurses (as far as I can tell) as quite different than infantry, therefore why does the army not have specific medical requirements?

 

JBoyd

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VancouverNurse said:
So I applied and got the letter of doom in the mail --
I completed everything, was told my interview was great -- then I was told I have a medical abnormality. (I personally loved that from the recruiter)

Yes - I have Type I Diabetes, and before everyone you close this topic, and everyone tells me to go pursue something else, or that I am medically unfit to be in the army. I will tell you  that I do not disagree, if I was looking for a physical role or piloting or so on.

What I do not understand is why they would automatically turn down my application for a nurse. I am almost completed nursing school, have amazing grades, and control my diabetes well, unfortunately they never even checked. I understand as a nurse I would be possibly deployed, but circumstances of nurses (as far as I can tell) as quite different than infantry, therefore why does the army not have specific medical requirements?

I am not 100% sure and someone please correct me if I am wrong, But I believe it is because in the CF you are a soldier first, trades-person second.
 

Occam

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Do a search for "Universality of Service" or "UoS".  That's the principle which you're failing to meet.

As a deployed nurse, the CF would be obligated to provide you with insulin.  What would happen if the supply of insulin to the deployed area were to be interrupted for any of numerous possible reasons?

There's your answer, in a nutshell.
 

ModlrMike

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The UoS principle at work here is:

Able to tolerate irregular meal timings, sometimes missing meals. (paraphrase).

In addition, insulin need to be kept in a fairly strict temperature zone, and that's just not possible in all cases.

I understand your anguish, but the reality is that not who applies gets accepted. The medical standards exist not only to protect your well being, but the well being of those around you.

In closing, the military does have specific standards for each occupation, but there's also the common enrolment standard that needs to be met.

 

Armymedic

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Thing is, right now, you are young, with good glycemic control, and otherwise healthy.

How are you going to be in 10 years?

How are your eyes, your feet, your kidneys?

It is not only about your health right now, but over the span of your 3-25 year career.

You are in nursing, look up how your disease can progress. I think you will see why you are not a suitable candidate.
 

Loachman

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I'm a Pilot, so I have a natural liking for nurses.

That gives me a greater-than-normal sympathy for your situation.

Two possibilities that may help you a little:

We are short of medical personnel, so some bases have civilian positions that you could possibly fill. The deployment aspect would not be a factor. You would be doing much the same job for the same people, but just not wearing a uniform. It's not quite the same thing, but it is close. How one gets such a job, however, I have no clue. I can ask when I get back to Borden. PM me in mid-May to remind me and I'll ask, if nobody else pipes up with a decent answer.

Cadet organizations are always looking for suitable leaders, either commissioned (CIC Officers) or Civilian Instructors. I do not know what the medical requirements are for the former, but you could try asking on the Cadet forum here. Again, I know that it's not the same thing, but it's still a satisfying and worthwhile contribution.

And you may be able to do both.
 

dapaterson

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Certain medical positions are filled by public servants - web sites like jobs.gc.ca will have job announcements.  Other positions are filled by contracts with HR firms, such as Calian.
 

Armymedic

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The civilian nurses hired by the CF are post graduate trained with specialties in mental health, surgery, critical care, or as Nurse Practitioners.

So she needs a bit more training and experience to get hired as a civ nurse by the CF.

 
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I appreciate all the responses, and I will look into the civ jobs when I graduate. The speciality programs are only 6 months long -- so definitely doable!!

And to person that told me to go look up what diabetes could possibly do to my body - I understand the complications of my diseases, I have done my research and am in nursing. I have an insulin pump - this would mean I would be self-sufficient without outside help for approximately 5 days, insulin can be held at room temperature for 30 days before it biodegrades, and complications occur due to horrible control of blood sugars. So in 25 years my eyes, kidneys and feet will be okay and that is realistic. I understand and would never tell anyone that I could be a soldier, but I could pass basic training with absolutely no issues and be an asset. I know it won't happen, I just wanted an explanation.

So Thanks!
 

dapaterson

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There are many ways to contribute to Canadian society inside and outside the CF.  My wife is an RN, working both a full-time and a part-time job; one to feed the bank, the other to feed her soul.  Look at different options and areas of practice, and find a place where you feel you can contribute and make a difference.
 
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