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The Arctic




China is gaining a major foothold in the Arctic as Russia, facing a severe budget crunch from its military assault on Ukraine, increasingly relies on Beijing and unprecedented levels of Chinese corporate and state investment to develop the northern region.

A new report by Strider Technologies, a leading U.S. strategic intelligence firm, says Russia has been forced to shift conventional defence spending away from the Arctic and to the war in Ukraine. In doing so, it has turned to China to help maintain its military and economic presence in the Arctic after years of seeking to limit Chinese involvement in the Far North.

Using proprietary data, Strider found that during the 18 months from January, 2022, to June, 2023, 234 Chinese-owned companies registered to operate in Russian-controlled Arctic territory, an 87-per-cent increase compared with registrations in the two years prior. As of June, 2023, 359 Chinese-owned companies operate in the region, Strider said, the result of a surge in investment over the last three years. Strider proprietary data are aggregated from across corporate, transaction, and open-source data sets.

Russia and China are also deepening their security ties, signing an agreement in April, 2023, to co-operate on maritime law enforcement. In August, 2023, they conducted joint exercises in the Bering Sea off the coast of Alaska – remaining in international waters. The Bering Sea is a gateway between the Arctic and Pacific oceans.

Chinese-Russian collaboration in the Arctic is a scenario Canada’s military intelligence has warned MPs about. “I would definitely agree that if Russia and China were to co-operate in the Arctic, it would pose significant threats to Canada’s ability to protect its sovereignty,” Major-General Michael Wright, Commander of Canadian Forces Intelligence Command and Chief of Defence Intelligence, told the Commons defence committee in October, 2022, more than six months after Russia’s assault on Ukraine began.

Not everybody puts their faith in courts. You might have to fight to hold what you have.
 
Canada's North is very vulnerable, and unfortunately the CAF does not have any reliable assets to compete and gain a major presence above the 50th parellel these days.

I think one of our major flaws is not having enough Arctic / Winter warfare preparation. Not having enough exercises in harsh arctic conditions to get ready for a possible attack or invasion from the North. Sure, we get EX: Rafale Blanche here during winter but it's not enough IMHO to be fully prepared to stay positioned longer up North. We should be one of those countries that are top-notch in terms of being able to fight in winter conditions like our scandinavian buddies Sweden, Norway, Denmark, ect. We have the rugged terrains and weather; we're only lacking persistent training in those areas.

We love our Rangers, but I wouldn't count on them to get the hard job done.
 
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Canada's North is very vulnerable, and unfortunately the CAF does not have any reliable assets to compete and gain a major presence above the 50th parellel these days.

I think one of our major flaws is not having enough Arctic / Winter warfare preparation. Not having enough exercises in harsh arctic conditions to get ready for a possible attack or invasion from the North. Sure, we get EX: Rafale Blanche here during winter but it's not enough IMHO to be fully prepared to stay positioned longer up North. We should be one of those countries that are top-notch in terms of being able to fight in winter conditions like our scandinavian buddies Sweden, Norway, Denmark, ect. We have the rugged terrains and weather; we're only lacking persistent training in those areas.

We love our Rangers, but I wouldn't count on them to get the hard job done.

Canada's not that bad off for cold weather operations, I would guess.

No one is well prepared for -60C, though, and the key success factor here is the availability of local infrastructure to support all the machinery and people you need to operate in the Arctic.

Scandinavia is relatively well developed and populated north of the Arctic Circle. For example, you can hop on a train in Oslo an get off in Tromso, more than 2000 miles north (which I recommend you do one day if you get a chance by the way - amazing country).

Canada? Not so much, in comparison.
 
It's on my To-Do list to visit Norway/Sweden one day for sure. And I agree that local supporting infrastructure isn't and won't be a thing in the next decades. We never had any major interests in doing so anyways, and with our retarded prime minister here in Quebec, we're lightyears away of having the North being developped.
 
Canada's not that bad off for cold weather operations, I would guess.

No one is well prepared for -60C, though, and the key success factor here is the availability of local infrastructure to support all the machinery and people you need to operate in the Arctic.
I would say your second comment (that I agree with) invalidated the first ;).

Scandinavia is relatively well developed and populated north of the Arctic Circle. For example, you can hop on a train in Oslo an get off in Tromso, more than 2000 miles north (which I recommend you do one day if you get a chance by the way - amazing country).

Canada? Not so much, in comparison.
Except in both Norway and Sweden they will utter tear up roads without significant warning and your 4hr trip becomes a 17hr backroad trek from hell.
 
I would say your second comment (that I agree with) invalidated the first ;).


Except in both Norway and Sweden they will utter tear up roads without significant warning and your 4hr trip becomes a 17hr backroad trek from hell.

Unless you also have, which you should - or else:

1) A navy, and
2) An air force

Norway is definitley not '1 man band' terrain ;)
 
So Canada is totally screwed.

Well, unless they fully mobilize their nation, so is Norway.

Uncle Sam remains about the only international player, along with Russia I would guess, who can deploy and sustain enough forces to successfully operate in the Arctic.

Which is why Canada, and the other member nations, needs NATO.
 
The USMC in the Arctic


Becca Wasser, a senior fellow at the Center for a New American Security, said that competition in the Arctic is expanding.

"Arctic is part of sort of the broader global commons. It's not just the United States and NATO who are present in the Arctic, you have Russian presence and to a certain extent burgeoning Chinese presence as well. So if you're looking at the Arctic, it's a critical region."
 
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