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Guitar_freak

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So.. am I the only one here really feeling the impact on inflation? We can hardly make ends meet here in Quebec. Does anyone know any rumours about pay increases ?
 

Remius

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So.. am I the only one here really feeling the impact on inflation? We can hardly make ends meet here in Quebec. Does anyone know any rumours about pay increases ?
PSAC is currently negociating a pay increase. I suspect CAF pay will be tied to the results of that exercise whenever it comes to a conclusion. With PSAC talking strike action I doubt it will be resolved any time soon.
 

kev994

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PSAC is currently negociating a pay increase. I suspect CAF pay will be tied to the results of that exercise whenever it comes to a conclusion. With PSAC talking strike action I doubt it will be resolved any time soon.
TBs offer was a joke, so nothing coming anytime soon.
 

dapaterson

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I would expect patterns to roughly parallel VIA Rail, a Crown corporation. In their new collective agreement a 5.5% wage increase in 2022, a 3.5% increase in 2023, and a 2.5% increase in 2024.


Normally, The GoC finds low-hanging fruit in a few smaller unions, and uses those settlements as a tool to convince other unions to settle for the same. Or groups like PIPSC, ACFO or others settle with the understanding that if PSAC gets more, they will as well - leaving PSAC to fight, and possibly strike, while they benefit.
 

ueo

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I would expect patterns to roughly parallel VIA Rail, a Crown corporation. In their new collective agreement a 5.5% wage increase in 2022, a 3.5% increase in 2023, and a 2.5% increase in 2024.


Normally, The GoC finds low-hanging fruit in a few smaller unions, and uses those settlements as a tool to convince other unions to settle for the same. Or groups like PIPSC, ACFO or others settle with the understanding that if PSAC gets more, they will as well - leaving PSAC to fight, and possibly strike, while they benefit.
Anything on pensions?
 

rmc_wannabe

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All Canadians are feeling the pinch of inflation, not just CAF members.
I will agree, however, unlike most Canadians, we have no recourse with our employer if wages don't keep up with inflation. Apart from releasing, we have no action to take, no one at the table when bargaining occurs, and are kept in the dark completely until the CANFORGEN drops.

I can understand the frustration of being on someone else's timetable and then picking up the scraps.
 

dapaterson

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Anything on pensions?
Any material changes to CAF pensions would require either amendments to the CFSA (an act of Parliament), amendments to its related regulations by the Governor in Council, or both.

I'm not certain whether the CFSA regulations are subject to prepublication or not.
 

kev994

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Any material changes to CAF pensions would require either amendments to the CFSA (an act of Parliament), amendments to its related regulations by the Governor in Council, or both.

I'm not certain whether the CFSA regulations are subject to prepublication or not.
There’s no appetite whatsoever to reopen the pension plan. Everyone seems to admit that the switch to 25 was a terrible decision but they’re terrified that if they reopen it we’ll lose the DB part of it.
 

dapaterson

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Any move from a DB plan would be across the board (PSSA, RCMPSA etc) and there's no appetite for that fight in GoC central agencies at this time; PS unions would fight that tooth and nail.

Increased longevity is one of the reasons the shift to 25 was necessary. Delinking pension from TOS was a net positive, vesting in two instead of ten years was as well. You can still be under 45 and get 50% of your best 5 years, indexed, for life as a CAF pension (with a survivor benefit to your spouse as long as you marry before 60).

The biggest risk to members in opening the plan to any significant change would be delinking from the PS group one contribution rates. CAF members contribute significantly less than 50% of the cost of their pensions. Moving the CAF to a 50/50 member/crown spilt would see a major spike in member contribution rates.
 

childs56

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I will agree, however, unlike most Canadians, we have no recourse with our employer if wages don't keep up with inflation. Apart from releasing, we have no action to take, no one at the table when bargaining occurs, and are kept in the dark completely until the CANFORGEN drops.

I can understand the frustration of being on someone else's timetable and then picking up the scraps.
Many other Canadians have the similar choices.
Keep the job at pay that doesn't keep up with inflation.
except they maybe Be laid off due to cost of business is to much.
they can quit their job and find something else that hopefully pays better.

Many do not have a voice over their pay, what they get paid they get paid. They are lucky to have the job they have. Many in the Military and other Government jobs have lost reality with jobs outside of the government. Cost of living is usually given to gov employees along with job security and decent benefits.
Lots of people work in sectors that are seasonal and or dependent on strong economies such as construction, tourism, manufacturing etc.

It has to be one of those grass is greener on the other side when in fact your mowing your green grass every week where your currently at. It just looks better at the gold course.
 

kev994

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Many other Canadians have the similar choices.
Keep the job at pay that doesn't keep up with inflation.
except they maybe Be laid off due to cost of business is to much.
they can quit their job and find something else that hopefully pays better.

Many do not have a voice over their pay, what they get paid they get paid. They are lucky to have the job they have. Many in the Military and other Government jobs have lost reality with jobs outside of the government. Cost of living is usually given to gov employees along with job security and decent benefits.
Lots of people work in sectors that are seasonal and or dependent on strong economies such as construction, tourism, manufacturing etc.

It has to be one of those grass is greener on the other side when in fact your mowing your green grass every week where your currently at. It just looks better at the gold course.
They get a new job first. What I’ve been hearing/reading is that with such low unemployment it’s easier to just get a new and better paying job than it is to negotiate with their current employer. Much easier to do when you don’t need to give 6 months notice.
 

childs56

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They get a new job first. What I’ve been hearing/reading is that with such low unemployment it’s easier to just get a new and better paying job than it is to negotiate with their current employer. Much easier to do when you don’t need to give 6 months notice.
Unfortunately most people are in the same boat, low pay and high turn over. Unless you have a specific skill set that is in need, or willing to be a laborer working your butt off there is not much out there for great money. Leaving one job that pays $60,000 yr for job that pays $65, 000 makes no sense unless it has a bigger expansive future which many do not.

To me having that 6 months notice assure you that you can prepare for the best case scenario and not rushed to leave your job. If things are that bad that 6 months is going to break you then there are other issues to look at.
When I left the Military I had a great job lined up, making double what I was making. The day I released and went to the shop, they had just started to lay off all their 200 field staff, so I had to go to plan B. That did not work out, so it was plan C, D, E,F G, H and I think I am on I now. Hindsight being what it was I should have stayed in done the 25years equivalent, then started a new career afterwards.
I can say for the $70,000ish I was making in the Military and all the paid time off I would have gotten was better then all the hours I worked to make double the pay and still get less guaranteed time off with way more headaches and uncertainties.

The grass is not always greener, but sometimes it is a different shade that appeals more.
 

Quirky

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The grass is not always greener, but sometimes it is a different shade that appeals more.

Too many people assume that military pay in trades is low, but they forget everything else besides the pay cheque that comes with it. If I was given an extra $10k a year to do what I do civy side I’d reject it, because my QOL, at this point, is irreplaceable.
 

QV

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So.. am I the only one here really feeling the impact on inflation? We can hardly make ends meet here in Quebec. Does anyone know any rumours about pay increases ?
There is no way the rate of inflation is as the government states. It has to be much higher in real numbers. Just look at what cost most commodities have risen by. How much has fuel risen in the last year? Bread? It’s way over 7%.
 

Navy_Pete

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There is no way the rate of inflation is as the government states. It has to be much higher in real numbers. Just look at what cost most commodities have risen by. How much has fuel risen in the last year? Bread? It’s way over 7%.
You can look at the data they use to calculate the CPI yourself at the link below; there are a bunch of different inflationary measures, which includes food. Some things are specfically listed as being in the 13-20+% range, others are lower, and when you include gas, which has been really volatile that can throw things off (right now it's at -10% compared to the previous month, and when they look at Sept compared to August the drop with be another 15%).

But something like bread can double (100% increase), and in real terms it might only cost $20 a month. Something like a mortgage or rent can go up a much smaller percentage and be a much higher monthly cost, so it's weighted, but CPI is still a crude indicator, and your mileage will vary depending on how your own personal monthlies split up.

Also, if you look at monthly changes for small increases, that will be a huge increase over time due to the magic of compounding interest.

The Daily — Consumer Price Index, July 2022
 
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