• Thanks for stopping by. Logging in to a registered account will remove all generic ads. Please reach out with any questions or concerns.

Majority of Canadians not interested in joining the CAF

Humphrey Bogart

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Reaction score
4,455
Points
1,360
At least 'Actors' didn't even make the list, which shows an unnerving degree of wisdom ;)
I mean my SO is a Banker. She tries to help people all the time but.....

She can't help them if they don't want to help themselves.

Interest Rates have made her job reeeaaaalllll interesting lately. Some people didn't account for the end of free money.😉
 

OldSolduer

Army.ca Legend
Reaction score
3,875
Points
1,110
Interest Rates have made her job reeeaaaalllll interesting lately. Some people didn't account for the end of free money.😉
Speaking of which the Winnipeg Sun cannot for the life of them find reliable delivery people. Thank you Mr Trudeau for paying people to sit on their fat asses for two years - now they don't want a job.
 

Humphrey Bogart

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Reaction score
4,455
Points
1,360
Speaking of which the Winnipeg Sun cannot for the life of them find reliable delivery people. Thank you Mr Trudeau for paying people to sit on their fat asses for two years - now they don't want a job.
I haven't deep dived in to the exact causes but my understanding from what I have read is it's a combination of:

1. People taking early retirement;
2. People who were at retirement age deciding to take retirement instead of continuing to work;
3. People who were already past retirement age but were still working, opting to retire;
4. Lack of immigration during Pandemic Border controls being in effect.

Combine this with our declining birth rates and you begin to see why there are shortages. Now we need to fill the gaps 😎
 

daftandbarmy

Army.ca Relic
Reaction score
10,462
Points
1,160
I haven't deep dived in to the exact causes but my understanding from what I have read is it's a combination of:

1. People taking early retirement;
2. People who were at retirement age deciding to take retirement instead of continuing to work;
3. People who were already past retirement age but were still working, opting to retire;
4. Lack of immigration during Pandemic Border controls being in effect.

Combine this with our declining birth rates and you begin to see why there are shortages. Now we need to fill the gaps 😎

A US article, but with similar patterns observed in Canada.

Subtitle: 'the CAF is probably screwed for years to come' ;)

TOP HIRING CHALLENGES FOR 2022: WHY IT’S SO HARD TO FILL JOBS RIGHT NOW​


As we move past disruptive Covid-19-related restrictions, new hiring challenges have emerged. With a record number of job openings and a large pool of qualified candidates who are, or should be, eager to accept job offers, many employers are struggling to fill positions. Why?

AN UNPRECEDENTED U.S. LABOR MARKET​

Demand for labor is historically high. The U.S. had 11.3 million job openings in January 2022, slightly down from a record 11.5 million in December 2021, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reported. A whopping 678,000 jobs were created in February.

So far, the economy has recovered 18.8 million of the 22.4 million jobs lost during the early days of the pandemic, when temporary closures and stay-at-home orders forced companies to lay off or furlough millions of workers. Service industries, such as retail, hotels, restaurants, healthcare and professional services, which were the hardest hit at the beginning of the pandemic, have posted the most gains.

The result is a very tight job market in which job openings outnumber job seekers. For every 100 job openings in January, there were only 60 unemployed workers available, significantly tighter than 84 per 100 job openings in 2019. At the start of the pandemic, in April 2020, there were 490 unemployed people for every 100 jobs.

Although expanded federal unemployment programs expired Sep. 6, there has been no rush of workers into the labor force. Covid-19 concerns, childcare issues (even after schools re-opened), and larger-than-usual financial cushions have dampened job seeker interest. In addition, wages are rising but not enough to offset inflation and temp passive job seekers.

6 TOUGHEST HIRING CHALLENGES FOR 2022​

As employers strive to rebuild capacity lost during the pandemic lockdowns, they’re running into some new hiring challenges.

1. THE GREAT RESIGNATION​

The Great Resignation, a trend that took off in 2020 and continued throughout 2021, is still in full swing, with 4.3 million people quitting their jobs in January 2022, according BLS data. Last year, almost 48 million workers quit their jobs, an annual record. The hiring rate is higher than the quits rate, indicating that most workers are moving to other jobs rather than quitting the labor force.

2. A GROWING DIVIDE​

Despite a record number of job openings and shortage of workers, employers continue to favor candidates with several years of experience and those who are available to work odd hours and willing to work on-site.

Workers, on the other hand, are seeking higher salaries, more flexibility (including flexible schedules and remote work options) and safe work environments. About 55% of job seekers on ZipRecruiter are seeking jobs that allow them to work from home, citing workplace safety concerns and childcare or family care needs.

This mismatch in priorities has created yet another post-Covid hiring challenge. Employers can’t fill their open positions, and job seekers can’t find jobs despite applying to numerous positions online.

So while the unemployment rate has gradually dropped to 3.8% in February 2022 from a 72-year high of 14.8% in April 2020, the number of long-term unemployed people (out of work more than six months) stands at about 2 million, BLS reported.

3. GREAT CHANGES AND GREAT EXPECTATIONS​

Job duties and work procedures in certain jobs and industries have changed considerably since pre-pandemic times. For example, to cope with staff shortages, some bars and night clubs have resorted to pre-mixing cocktails in batches to save time. This trend works against experienced bartenders.

Ironically, however desperate employers are to find workers, many are unwilling to adjust their ways and expectations, refusing to raise wages to competitive levels and placing additional demands on employees, such as new on-call schedules.

Nevertheless, the tables have turned. Before the labor market shifted, employers would ask job candidates, “What makes you a good fit for this company?” Now, it’s the other way around: “Let me tell you why our company is a good fit for you.”

4. ROBOTS SNUB PROMISING CANDIDATES​

In spite of it being a job seeker’s labor market, many candidates cannot find a job. Blame the robots.

Seeking to streamline their job application processes, more companies are using automated screening systems that exclude candidates who are not a near perfect fit “on paper.” According to a Harvard Business School study, nearly half of employers say they automatically reject candidates who have not worked in more than six months, regardless of the circumstances.

Job seekers apply to job postings assuming that a human being will read their applications and resumes. That’s usually not the case these days. More than 90% of major employers are using automated screening systems to process job applications, Harvard Business School reported.

These systems use algorithms that can weed out unqualified and qualified candidates. Even using a wrong word or not using the exact right ones can eliminate a promising candidate. Consequently, despite having college degrees and decades of experience in suitable roles, many candidates are getting rejected within hours of filling out online job applications.

5. RETAINING TOP PERFORMERS​

At a time when hiring has become so difficult, employers should focus a bit more on retaining their good employees. This requires examining their corporate culture, compensation packages, perks and company policies from the perspective of retaining, rather than just attracting, employees.

One popular retention effort is to conduct “stay” interviews as a preventative step to stop their best talent from quitting. These informal check-in conversations take place every few months to discuss anything that could prevent employees from thriving at work.

6. LOW WAGES TURN OFF JOB SEEKERS​

The No. 1 reason businesses struggle to fill open jobs is that wages are too low, according to a survey of more than 3,000 hourly workers conducted by employer payment platform Branch. Fear of exposure to Covid-19 at work came in second with 46% of the vote.

Sixty-eight percent of the employees surveyed agreed that people can earn more from unemployment benefits and stimulus checks than from working for the retailers, hotels and restaurants that are desperate for workers.

WORKERS LIKELY TO HAVE UPPER HAND IN 2022​

How long can this superheated job market last? The short-term outlook for the labor market suggests that workers are likely to continue to have considerable bargaining power in 2022. Even when more job candidates enter the labor market as Covid-19 concerns subside and childcare options increase, demand for workers seems likely to continue to outpace supply for the rest of the year, Indeed Hiring Lab reported.


 

Humphrey Bogart

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Reaction score
4,455
Points
1,360
How many jobs in Canada offer the pension and benefit package that the CF offers?
I'm really curious how many people actually make it to pension age in the CAF? I imagine a substantial portion never actually collect a pension due to many reasons.

As for the benefits, I can't even get a bloody back massage. I have to deal with absolute garbage like BGRS every few years and I can't get timely preventative medical care. The benefits are over-rated and are being continuously watered down.
 

daftandbarmy

Army.ca Relic
Reaction score
10,462
Points
1,160
I'm really curious how many people actually make it to pension age in the CAF? I imagine a substantial portion never actually collect a pension due to many reasons.

As for the benefits, I can't even get a bloody back massage. I have to deal with absolute garbage like BGRS every few years and I can't get timely preventative medical care. The benefits are over-rated and are being continuously watered down.

'Benefits' and 'job security' are a part of the scam they run so they can treat you poorly, and pay you chump change, without having to worry as much about you quitting for another job.

Independence and self-agency are the best cure for that ;)
 

lenaitch

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
1,049
Points
1,040
The CAF ranks high on the 2022 list of, "Most respected occupations in Canada".



2022 Respect score by profession
  • Paramedics – 92.0
  • Firefighters – 91.4
  • Nurses – 89.6
  • Farmers – 88.7
  • Medical Doctors – 86.5
  • Pharmacists – 85.1
  • Members of Armed Forces – 84.2
  • Scientists – 82.9
  • Airline pilots – 82.4
  • Grocery store workers – 80.8
  • Transit workers – 80.6
  • Teachers – 80.1
  • Veterinarians – 79.9
  • Engineers – 79.8
  • Police officers – 70.5
  • Judges – 68.8
  • Private sector long-term care home operators – 62.7
  • Journalists – 58.4
  • Lawyers – 55.8
  • Radio/TV talk show hosts – 54.0
  • Bankers – 53.8
  • Clergy – 52.9
  • Professional athletes – 50.6
  • Business executives – 48.6
  • Union leaders – 46.7
  • Elected members of parliament – 46.3
  • Advertising practitioners – 41.6
  • Car salespeople – 40.3
  • Owners of social media platforms – 33.9
As a retired police officer, it always hurts to loose out the firefighters. Our profession needs to start rescuing more kittens in trees. I suppose there is some cold comfort in beating out car salespersons.

This has an obvious Covid angle to it. It would me interesting to compare it to a pre-Covid survey.
How many jobs in Canada offer the pension and benefit package that the CF offers?
In terms of recruiting or being attractive to the workforce, how many of hiring age are even thinking about pension or benefits? I know in my 20s I wasn't.
 

Humphrey Bogart

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Reaction score
4,455
Points
1,360
'Benefits' and 'job security' are a part of the scam they run so they can treat you poorly, and pay you chump change, without having to worry as much about you quitting for another job.

Independence and self-agency are the best cure for that ;)
Pretty much!
 

RangerRay

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
671
Points
1,110
It’s not just the military suffering recruiting problems. 20 years ago in my profession there would be 300 candidates for one position opening and hopefuls would work seasonally for 10 years before that elusive full-time position opened up. Potential recruits relished the chance for adventure in a remote part of the province. Now, we can’t hire enough recruits to make up for retirements, we can’t hire enough seasonal staff to fill seasonal vacancies. Add to that no one wants to go to remote postings and where once you could offer adventure in lieu of high pay, we now offer increased work load and chronic understaffing to go with the relative low pay. And we wonder why no one wants to work for us. 🤔
 

Grimey

Jr. Member
Reaction score
53
Points
280
'Benefits' and 'job security' are a part of the scam they run so they can treat you poorly, and pay you chump change, without having to worry as much about you quitting for another job.
Not so much a scam as a sop from my current employer to appear attractive against private (and tbh) better paying public sector wage scales. The problem is, and it maybe finally dawning on the brain trust, a young person starting out and who needs to pay rent or for the lucky few, put money down on a home, could give a flying fcuk about a defined benefit pension plan. Twenty-five years down the road maybe, or when kids are in the picture. Right now I have good people voting with their feet, and it’s increasingly difficult to back-fill.
 

Good2Golf

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Mentor
Reaction score
7,930
Points
1,360
Ironically, however desperate employers are to find workers, many are unwilling to adjust their ways and expectations, refusing to raise wages to competitive levels and placing additional demands on employees, such as new on-call schedules.

CAF, thinking this is an honorable and worthy maintenance of tradition, takes a self-congratulatory bow…as the true issue sails by overhead.


How many jobs in Canada offer the pension and benefit package that the CF offers?
I'm really curious how many people actually make it to pension age in the CAF? I imagine a substantial portion never actually collect a pension due to many reasons.

Even Japanese work ethic has changed from the ‘live your life in one company and that golden egg pension’ to a more varied career.

Whatever makes the CAF think that a 25-year DB pension is either desired by the target demographics, or even competitive with the developing workforce mindset makes one wonder.

As for the benefits, I can't even get a bloody back massage. I have to deal with absolute garbage like BGRS every few years and I can't get timely preventative medical care. The benefits are over-rated and are being continuously watered down.
…which compounds the ‘loosing/lost touch’ factor with the CAF’s HR mindset…’expect more, give less’ is not the marque of an ‘employer of choice.’ 🙄
 

Weinie

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
2,371
Points
1,110
CAF, thinking this is an honorable and worthy maintenance of tradition, takes a self-congratulatory bow…as the true issue sails by overhead.





Even Japanese work ethic has changed from the ‘live your life in one company and that golden egg pension’ to a more varied career.

Whatever makes the CAF think that a 25-year DB pension is either desired by the target demographics, or even competitive with the developing workforce mindset makes one wonder.


…which compounds the ‘loosing/lost touch’ factor with the CAF’s HR mindset…’expect more, give less’ is not the marque of an ‘employer of choice.’ 🙄
I see what you did there.
 

Halifax Tar

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
2,045
Points
1,260
…which compounds the ‘loosing/lost touch’ factor with the CAF’s HR mindset…’expect more, give less’ is not the marque of an ‘employer of choice.’ 🙄

And that's the kicker. I don't think people mind hard work and sacrifice. They just expect a fair remuneration for the effort.

Correct me if my wrong but does the TBS not set our pay and benefits ? For some reason I feel like it's really not in our control.
 

btrudy

Member
Reaction score
152
Points
610
And that's the kicker. I don't think people mind hard work and sacrifice. They just expect a fair remuneration for the effort.

Correct me if my wrong but does the TBS not set our pay and benefits ? For some reason I feel like it's really not in our control.

People need to stop pretending like Treasury Board is some sort of immutable force of nature. Or, anything other than another branch of the government. We're employed by the government.

Like... if you go ask Dad for something, him telling you that Mom won't let him doesn't lead to a satisfying answer. If we're having retention issues because of pay and PLD, that's a problem for the government to solve. I, as a service member, aren't going to nod my head and accept the fact that the CAF can't talk TBS into helping to fix the problem any more than I'd accept that, I dunno, that the Engineers can't talk the Log guys into getting that part we need.

It's a problem that the organization as a whole needs to fix, or we'll keep bleeding people. The fact that we've seen no movement whatsoever on the issue is a very clear sign that the organization as a whole doesn't really care about the fact that we are bleeding people.

And every service member should be taking that lesson to heart: loyalty is a two way street, and if your employer doesn't appear to be giving a shit about you, then you sure as hell shouldn't be giving a shit about them.
 
Top