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Hybrid Electric Vehicles

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Hybrid-Electric Troop Transports Are Moving Toward the Battlefield​

The quieter, cooler, less maintenance-intensive vehicles will make up at least part of the Army’s future fleet.​



Marcus Weisgerber
BY MARCUS WEISGERBER

GLOBAL BUSINESS EDITOR
OCTOBER 14, 2022 02:16 PM ET

From the outside, the open-air troop transport on display inside the Washington Convention Center looks like the ones being purchased by the U.S. Army. But under the hood, it's a different story.
The souped-up dune buggy, a militarized version of the Chevrolet Colorado ZR2 pickup truck, is fully powered by batteries. Gone is the diesel fuel engine, replaced with an electric motor. It’s the type of technology that one would expect to see at the Washington Auto Show—held inside this very same building—not at the largest land-warfare show in the United States.
Yet as demand for electric and hybrid passenger vehicles increases across the United States, the U.S. Army too is getting closer to adopting the same propulsion technology in armored personnel carriers. Military vehicle manufacturers are making sizable investments in the technology, some of which were on display this week at the Association of the U.S. Army’s annual meeting in Washington.
For the Army, hybrid and electric vehicles are not just about saving the planet, but also saving soldiers’ lives. They run quieter and emit less heat than ones running on a combustion engine, helping to conceal them from sensors on satellites, aircraft, and missiles.
“It's got a really low IR signature,” Stephen duMont, the president of GM Defense, said of the all-electric Infantry Squad Vehicles at this week’s conference. “There's no hot engine. There's no hot exhaust pipe. There's no hot hood. Those are the things that tend to give you contrast when you're targeting.”
DuMont would know; as a former Army Apache attack helicopter pilot, he spent years using infrared to spot his targets.
While the Army appears less immediately interested in all-electric military vehicles, hybrid personal carriers—ones that run on diesel fuel and batteries—could find themselves on the battlefield by the next decade. All five companies bidding to replace the four-decade-old Bradley fighting vehicle have proposed new troop carriers with hybrid electric engines, according to Army officials.


“That's a major shift for us,” Maj. Gen. Glenn Dean, program executive officer of Ground Combat Systems, said Monday. “Each [company] has taken a different approach to how they achieve the hybrid electric. So that's really exciting that we have sort of a wide range of risk-based approaches.”
The Army isn’t requiring companies to use hybrid technology in the Bradley replacement, called the Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle, but leaders are encouraged to see companies including the technology in their proposals.
“What we have specified for requirements revolve around things like fuel efficiency, silent watch, and other operational requirements for the vehicle that really lend themselves to a hybrid electric solution,” Brig. Gen. Geoff Norman, director of Army’s Next Generation Combat Vehicles Cross Functional Team, said during a Monday briefing.
“Silent watch” means running electronics and sensors inside a vehicle while the engine is turned off.
The Army’s climate plan is calling for more electric and hybrid vehicles. It is also looking for ways to retrofit existing vehicles with hybrid or electric propulsion. It has been testing two hybrid electric Bradleys.
“We're comfortable [that] if we can package for Bradley, we can package for most of the other combat vehicles in the fleet,” Dean said.
Oshkosh Defense, which makes the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, created a hybrid version of the troop carrier that’s replacing the Humvee. In the coming weeks, the hybrid truck will participate in a “real-world simulation” for the Army, said George Mansfield, vice president and general manager of joint programs for Oshkosh Defense.
The hybrid JLTV can drive up to 45 miles per hour for 30 miles on its batteries, Mansfield said. It can run in silent-watch mode for eight hours. The combustion engine can recharge those batteries in about 30 minutes.
“You can imagine the fuel-economy savings [since] you're not sitting there idling for eight hours,” he said. “We've done a lot of testing, we're at about 20 percent fuel economy savings [and] we've got a couple other things that we want to do to the vehicle to give us another three to 5 percent fuel-economy savings.”
After some tweaks, the company is hoping to get more distance and speed in battery mode, Mansfield said. Like commercial hybrids, the hybrid JLTV regenerates power when the brakes are applied.
The hybrid JLTV’s batteries make it roughly 1,000 pounds heavier than the regular combustion fuel version. The company says existing JLTVs—it has produced more than 18,000 of them—could be retrofitted into the hybrid version if the Army wants.
Oshkosh, which also makes fire engines, trash haulers, mail trucks, and other types of large fleet vehicles, has been working with hybrid power since 2005, Mansfield said.
General Dynamics Land Systems showed off hybrid versions of its Abrams tank and Stryker.
GM Defense benefits from the billions of dollars spent by General Motors to develop electric vehicles for the commercial market.
“We bring the commercial scale of General Motors and we also bring the investment that comes with the massive supply chain we have to source materials at scale, [which] allows us to drive costs down, bring more value to our customers,” duMont said.
But, duMont said, the division’s small size allows him to run the business as if it were a startup. That allowed the company to convert its Infantry Squad Vehicle into a battery-powered vehicle in three months.
“We want to be the trusted partner of our defense and government customers as they make this journey to a more electric, autonomous and connected future,” he said. “We feel like leveraging the big commercial investment is a really smart way to go.”
There are still lots of questions about if or when full-electric tanks and armored vehicles will find their way into combat. They require charging infrastructure to juice up batteries, but also require less maintenance because they have far fewer moving parts and generate far less heat.
GM Defense is experimenting with a towable battery trailer.
“It's the infrastructure challenge, really, that we have to and we're focused heavily on working that infrastructure challenge with our customers, in this case with the Army to understand how we enable them to bring power, bring energy, out into the battlespace, and move power to the tactical edge,” duMont said. “So that's a big focus of ours as well.”
ltimately, we know the end state is to move towards all-electric because there's so much value in not having the redundancy in the powertrain and redundancy [in] dual engines, dual fuel sources, but it's a logical step,” he said. “We're looking at getting to a point where the vehicle is incredibly survivable, very reliable and supports all the mission needs.”
The Army has purchased a new all-electric GMC Hummer for experiments, but it’s a non-militarized truck.


And in the MILCOTS catalogue


 
I can see the running replen now. The Sergeants Major call sign followed by a convoy of trucks and generators. Adding over 1000 pounds to a pickup that isn't overly nimble cross country is asking for trouble and reduces the functional payload. Someone in procurement needs to recognise in the winter, in Canada, batteries don't work. At least, not very well.
 
Hybrid car batteries weigh in around 120lbs. But they also do away with transmission, starter and alternator. Likely for a truck like this, you could double the battery weigh. The new Toyota crossover hybrid apparently gets 100 miles on the battery alone. Remember these also have engines.
 
Kinda-sorta related but I saw this article in the Toronto Star related to battery electric fire apparatus. I was impressed with the one model being able to pump for 2 1/2 hours, but I don't know how that compares to traditional diesel equipment. Long, working scenes are fairly uncommon these days, but it begs the question how this would impact the fleet if/when they become more than a one-off. Also, that recharge rate and voltage indicates substantial 3-phase grid power, which might be a challenge for the military.

 
I can see the running replen now. The Sergeants Major call sign followed by a convoy of trucks and generators. Adding over 1000 pounds to a pickup that isn't overly nimble cross country is asking for trouble and reduces the functional payload. Someone in procurement needs to recognise in the winter, in Canada, batteries don't work. At least, not very well.
We having been testing Hybrid systems in the winter in Alaska…
 
This is the little beauty I want.
 
Kinda-sorta related but I saw this article in the Toronto Star related to battery electric fire apparatus. I was impressed with the one model being able to pump for 2 1/2 hours, but I don't know how that compares to traditional diesel equipment. Long, working scenes are fairly uncommon these days, but it begs the question how this would impact the fleet if/when they become more than a one-off. Also, that recharge rate and voltage indicates substantial 3-phase grid power, which might be a challenge for the military.

2.5hrs is nothing in a major disaster like the ice storm or an earthquake. Electric firetrucks are a novelty item or a very niche item.
 
I prefer the Utility version...

That's ok for the Villages, with their private roads for golf carts.

But, I was interested if this would be street legal in Ont..
Because, I would not mind having one.

The air conditioned Ion is a 2 Seat 3 Door Hatchback powered by a 4.5KW BLDC Drive System with Regenerative Braking. It comes standard with, Power Steering, Power Windows, Power Door Locks, Back Up Camera, Bluetooth Stereo, Low Beam Headlights, High Beam Headlights, LED Brake Lights Air Conditioning, Heat, Wipers and Self Canceling Turn Signals. The possibilities of having fun are endless when it comes to the ATOMIC ION. It is a Value Packed, Feature Rich Golf Car that is ready to have fun when you are. While your having fun the ATOMIC ION is busy keeping you safe with safety features like Side Impact Bars, Occupant Safety Cage, Seat Belts and Laminated Glass. All Atomic Golf Cars are capable of being charged on 110v or 220v with the standard intelli-charger. Simply put, it is as easy to charge as a cell phone.
 
2.5hrs is nothing in a major disaster like the ice storm or an earthquake. Electric firetrucks are a novelty item or a very niche item.
That depends on where one is located and levels of support.

Electric only I see as foolish at this point in time, but Diesel/Electric Hybrids make a lot of compelling advantages even outside the .Mil
 
That depends on where one is located and levels of support.

Electric only I see as foolish at this point in time, but Diesel/Electric Hybrids make a lot of compelling advantages even outside the .Mil
I am an actual fan of Hybrids and I think they are the way to go for Canada. Pure EV's are niche vehicles and will be that way for a long time.
 
I am an actual fan of Hybrids and I think they are the way to go for Canada. Pure EV's are niche vehicles and will be that way for a long time.
I also understand that D/E hybrids can be less effective in the cold, but I think the overall advantages of D/E versus a Gas/E system is worth it.
 
Just Transition, Global Warming, Climate Change, Pipelines.... choose your pick

A battery and an electric motor = many fewer moving parts than a gas tank, an internal combustion engine and a transmission = lots fewer jobs.

Ford is to cut 1,300 jobs in the UK over the next three years as it shifts production towards electric vehicles

Meanwhile Tim Slatter, chairman of Ford’s UK arm, was at pains to point out that the economic backdrop was at least partly a factor. “Here in Europe … the outlook is uncertain. High inflation, higher interest rates, the ongoing war in Ukraine, cost of energy and so on,” he said.

But it was Sander who eventually cut through all the noise to lay the decision fairly squarely at the door of electrification. “There is significantly less work to be done on drivetrains moving out of combustion engines,” he said. “We are moving into a world with less [sic] global platforms where less engineering work is necessary. This is why we have to make the adjustments.”

Ford’s intervention is particularly significant because it is possible to extrapolate from the latest round of job cuts and arrive at an approximate figure for the industry as a whole as it goes electric.

The redundancies make up just over 40pc of Ford’s European product development team, which includes designers, engineers and testers, and is roughly in line with boss Jim Farley’s recent warning that a company employing 183,000 worldwide would ultimately need 40pc fewer staff to develop battery models. One assumes that the figure will be roughly the same for other major carmakers.
 
The entire article


Ford just exposed the biggest lie of net zero​

Electric cars will be a disaster for blue collar workers
BEN MARLOW
CHIEF CITY COMMENTATOR
15 February 2023 • 6:00am


Now is not a good time to be working in Britain’s car industry. Nobody said the shift to electric vehicles was going to be smooth, but the true scale of the disruption is only just starting to be understood.
The level of reinvention required on the path to decarbonisation is almost akin to starting again. Entire business models that have existed for decades are being torn up, factories mothballed, and car line-ups dramatically scaled back.
Honda brought down the curtain on its Swindon plant in 2021, not because of Brexit as some Remainers had disingenuously claimed, but due to a need to “accelerate” its “electrification strategy” and “restructure” the Japanese outfit’s “global operations accordingly,” Honda’s Europe chief, Katsushi Inoue, said at the time.
More recently, BMW has announced it will shift production of the electric Mini from Cowley, Oxford to a new plant in China’s eastern province of Jiangsu later this year. Jaguar Land Rover had been planning to build a battery gigafactory near Bristol or Redcar, but after a row with the Government over the level of state support, has reportedly threatened to choose Slovakia instead.


Meanwhile, a new generation of start-ups that is meant to be spearheading the revolution are struggling to get off the ground. Battery hopeful Britshvolt managed to last all of a year before it collapsed after burning through its cash pile.
Ultimately the company’s business plan was deeply flawed and its prospects wildly over-egged, but none the less it is further evidence of the huge challenges inherent in trying to create not just an entirely new industry from scratch, but so too the infrastructure required to support it.

But it is the announcement of several thousand job losses at Ford that will send the biggest shockwaves through the global car sector – 3,800 in total, 2,300 of which will come in Germany, 1,300 in the UK, and the remaining 200 across the rest of Europe.
While the numbers themselves are pretty grim, it is the pointed comments from its German chief about the reason behind the redundancies that jump out.
One of the central premises of net zero is that the resulting job destruction in old industries such as car-making, but also oil and gas exploration, construction and farming, will be more than offset by the job creation in green industries such as renewable energy – but if the remarks of Ford Germany’s boss Martin Sander are anything to go by, that looks doubtful at best.
There were the usual empty corporate platitudes about recognising “the uncertainty it creates” for employees – an understatement if ever there was one – and how those affected would receive “full support in the months ahead”.
Meanwhile Tim Slatter, chairman of Ford’s UK arm, was at pains to point out that the economic backdrop was at least partly a factor. “Here in Europe … the outlook is uncertain. High inflation, higher interest rates, the ongoing war in Ukraine, cost of energy and so on,” he said.
But it was Sander who eventually cut through all the noise to lay the decision fairly squarely at the door of electrification. “There is significantly less work to be done on drivetrains moving out of combustion engines,” he said. “We are moving into a world with less [sic] global platforms where less engineering work is necessary. This is why we have to make the adjustments.”

Ford is to cut 1,300 jobs in the UK over the next three years as it shifts production towards electric vehicles CREDIT: Alex Kraus/Bloomberg
Ford’s intervention is particularly significant because it is possible to extrapolate from the latest round of job cuts and arrive at an approximate figure for the industry as a whole as it goes electric.
The redundancies make up just over 40pc of Ford’s European product development team, which includes designers, engineers and testers, and is roughly in line with boss Jim Farley’s recent warning that a company employing 183,000 worldwide would ultimately need 40pc fewer staff to develop battery models. One assumes that the figure will be roughly the same for other major carmakers.
There will be those who argue that as one of the world’s biggest manufacturers of petrol and diesel cars, it is in firmly in Ford’s interests to exaggerate the fallout, and that might have been true not so long ago.

But having been a late adopter, Ford is now among those leading the charge with a pledge to boost spending on electric vehicles to $50bn (£41bn), from $30bn previously, by 2026 and run its electric car unit separately from its legacy combustion engine operations, in a move aimed at catching trailblazer Tesla. So perhaps we should take Farley at face value.
The fate of Swindon’s Honda operations is similarly instructive but for other reasons. When the plant closed its doors for the final time, the 3,000 people that lost their jobs were promised they would quickly find new jobs – either at other local manufacturers, or under plans to transform the site from a car factory into a logistics park.
But recruiters in the area were quick to dismiss the suggestion that there were enough local jobs to go around, or that many would offer the same pay, while converting the old Honda factory is expected to take a decade.
None of this is to doubt the benefits of decarbonising the planet, but the Government and big companies need to be more honest about the costs of net zero, because they are likely to be astronomical, and to be born disproportionately by the sort of blue-collar workers that Ford employs across the world. So in that sense, its frankness is something of a breath of fresh air.
 
Any western manufacturer that moves it's operations to Red China needs to be boycotted out of existence.

"the 3,000 people that lost their jobs were promised they would quickly find new jobs – either at other local manufacturers, or under plans to transform the site from a car factory into a logistics park. But recruiters in the area were quick to dismiss the suggestion that there were enough local jobs to go around, or that many would offer the same pay, while converting the old Honda factory is expected to take a decade."

The foretelling of trudeau's 'Just Transition' Another globalist grand scheme that will result in utter failure, low wages and destitute workers, while accomplishing nothing but pain and poverty.

.unhappy.jpg
 
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I follow a law blog on doing business in China, they are transitioning to "How to move your business from China to Mexico"
In the 80's. I was offered a supervisors job, in Mexico, for Chrysler. Once I looked into it, I passed. The first tell was when they told me I would have a company home in a gated secured, guarded compound. We'd all get on the same bus, with an armed escort front and back to go to and from work. At work you were forbidden to go down to the production floor and spent the day watching workers and production from a gantry, inaccessible, from below. The workers had made shanty towns out of boxes and other stuff. The last supervisor that went down on the floor was stabbed to death. There were zero perks, except the higher pay and usual benefits, etc. They got a hard no from me.
 
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