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Basic Reconaissance Patrolman Course

TheProfessional

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I've put up my name for BRP and being recommended by my CoC. I'm a reservist and there's limited spots on recce courses so I'm not holding my breath. However, there's a chance I could go.

Anyone here did it ? If so, what to expect from a course like this? The good/bad etc? Spots for Reservists apparently don't come up too often for BRP, is it a worthwhile course?
 

daftandbarmy

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I've put up my name for BRP and being recommended by my CoC. I'm a reservist and there's limited spots on recce courses so I'm not holding my breath. However, there's a chance I could go.

Anyone here did it ? If so, what to expect from a course like this? The good/bad etc? Spots for Reservists apparently don't come up too often for BRP, is it a worthwhile course?

Based on my (now somewhat dated) experience....

Be physically fit. And not just 'FORCE Test Fit'.

Others with more recent experience might weigh in here, but the greatest challenge a reservist will have on this course is meeting the fitness standards required by training in your own time. This mainly means alot of rucking with progressively greater loads on your back (without injuring yourself).

That and a good standard of basic Infantry fieldcraft and weapons handing skills, with a huge focus on confident map and compass work for obvious reasons.

Good luck! It's an excellent course, and I'd recommend that everyone in the Combat Arms should should do it at one point in their careers.
 
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Concur with above poster.
1) Be very physically fit. No complicated training needed do pushups, pull-ups and air-squats most days also go for a 5-10 KM run and/or Rucksack also most days months prior. In addition eat healthy nutritious food daily you can have desert but get good food into you as well.
2) Have very strong map and compass skills then practice them outside. Simple things like reading ground, striking a bearing remembering to set declination and that metal(rifle) throws off the compass are all crucial.
3) Ability to function on little sleep and food for a few weeks. The exercise and good nutrition the months prior pays big dividends here.
4) Ability to be cheerful and a part of the team despite the physical suck.


The course is physically challenging and your basic soldier skills have to be very strong before you go as learning required skills while there is near impossible.
 

TheProfessional

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Thanks for the feedback guys.

Buddy of mine did it years back and he said that the course is just pure cock and that you don't actually learn anything. Would you guys say that's true?
 

daftandbarmy

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Thanks for the feedback guys.

Buddy of mine did it years back and he said that the course is just pure cock and that you don't actually learn anything. Would you guys say that's true?

That depends on who runs it, of course, although it shouldn't.

The courses I've been involved in were really challenging, but good training value.
 

Jarnhamar

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Thanks for the feedback guys.

Buddy of mine did it years back and he said that the course is just pure cock and that you don't actually learn anything. Would you guys say that's true?
Depends who you do your course with. Some units treat it like a basic reconnaissance patrolman course. Others want to LARP special forces and treat it like tryouts for whatever boys club.

Get used to ruck marching with heavy loads (100lbs +). Also do farmers carry with heavy weights.

Break out all the notes you took on your infantry course and go over the basics. Why things are seen. How to do a 3 point (and 1 point) resection. How to set magnetic declination on a map. Symbols on a map. You know, in case there is a test to gauge your baseline knowledge on day 1.

 

KevinB

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Depends who you do your course with. Some units treat it like a basic reconnaissance patrolman course. Others want to LARP special forces and treat it like tryouts for whatever boys club.

Get used to ruck marching with heavy loads (100lbs +). Also do farmers carry with heavy weights.

Break out all the notes you took on your infantry course and go over the basics. Why things are seen. How to do a 3 point (and 1 point) resection. How to set magnetic declination on a map. Symbols on a map. You know, in case there is a test to gauge your baseline knowledge on day 1.

Having done long walks in the dark with 100lb plus heavy loads - I can guarantee that it's 110% pointless, and would hope that sort of idiocy has been stamped out. It was really big in the early 90's, but all it does is break a lot of troops for no gain.
There are much better ways to gut check folks without resorting to overloading troops to the point of permanent injury.
 

WestIsle

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It was absurdly outside the envelope of 'basic' requirements and seemed more like a gigantic dick measuring contest. I think half of the candidates thundered in before the half way point, and there were alot of injuries.
BRP in 3 Div at least is a lot of what is wrong with the CAF all the while being a huge cost to run and creating a seemingly duplicate asset in battalion battlegroups
 

RedFive

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BRP in 3 Div at least is a lot of what is wrong with the CAF all the while being a huge cost to run and creating a seemingly duplicate asset in battalion battlegroups
I did my BRP in 3 Div and thundered in early due to injury, as a Reservist. Was accused of malingering, a lack of fitness and a lack of fortitude. Never went back, and still face on-going difficulties with my back from trying to push through.

As has been stated above, fitness, map and compass and basic infantry skills are what to work on. Don't go unless you're certain you want it and will put in the effort, even properly run the course is challenging and requires a high level of mental grit. If you do get hurt, be prepared to leave before you do permanent damage. Its not worth it, especially as a reservist.
 

QV

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In the early 2000's when I did this course I was in my early 20's, about 165lbs, and could run 10k in around 40-42 min while smoking a cigarette and do pullups for days. I found the course was challenging. The ruck weights were 100+ lbs, the distances were long, cross country day and night, and under time constraints. I learned a lot of things on that late October course including to never ever leave behind my air mattress thinking I was saving space/weight, and my American poncho was not a sufficient rain barrier (I suffered greatly for all of that).

It was one of the better experiences of my career, but recommend you do it young if you can.
 

TheProfessional

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Thanks for the feedback guys.

I'm in 4 Div so I assume the BRP I put my name up for would be in Petawawa run by RCR. Wether that's a good thing or not I don't know. Of note, there will be a mandarory pre BRP before the actual course in late August.

Is the course all field or is there a garrison portion as well?
 

Jarnhamar

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Some courses are a mix of a bit of classroom and then the field. Other courses you're in the field the whole time, with classes done in the field.

Petawawa is expecting an influx of dp1s this summer. Space will be tight and so will meal timings. You might be living in a hooch the whole time eating rations.
 

daftandbarmy

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Some courses are a mix of a bit of classroom and then the field. Other courses you're in the field the whole time, with classes done in the field.

Petawawa is expecting an influx of dp1s this summer. Space will be tight and so will meal timings. You might be living in a hooch the whole time eating rations.

Wear your house, like a turtle ;)

rambo GIF
 

markppcli

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The thing is that the primary purpose of a BRP is to fill up recce platoon. It’s also generally ran by Recce platoon. While their is some training content it is normally a try out to go over to combat support l
 

TheProfessional

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With regards to the physical fitness aspect, my PT routine is focussed on heavy lifting and running. I do heavy compound lifts 3x week( I alternates between squats-bench press-barbell rows and squats-overhead press- deadlifts, with some additional push ups, sit ups, chinups and dips thrown in as well and I do progressive overload ), and I end each workout with a quick interval session with Frag vest/ training plates on. I also run 5km 2x a week working on improving my time. I suppose I could add some rucking to my PT routine but honestly I feel like if you lift heavy, then ruck marches aren't a problem usually.

Thanks again for the feedback guys. Let me know what you think about my PT and wether it's good prep for a recce course.
 

Kat Stevens

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With regards to the physical fitness aspect, my PT routine is focussed on heavy lifting and running. I do heavy compound lifts 3x week( I alternates between squats-bench press-barbell rows and squats-overhead press- deadlifts, with some additional push ups, sit ups, chinups and dips thrown in as well and I do progressive overload ), and I end each workout with a quick interval session with Frag vest/ training plates on. I also run 5km 2x a week working on improving my time. I suppose I could add some rucking to my PT routine but honestly I feel like if you lift heavy, then ruck marches aren't a problem usually.

Thanks again for the feedback guys. Let me know what you think about my PT and wether it's good prep for a recce course.
Long distance rucking is it's own thing, especially on uneven undulating terrain. Picking heavy things up and putting them down is helpful, but not the same thing.
 

KevinB

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I would add some longer cross country runs if you can.
10-15km with a light ruck (25lbs) x2 a week.

Also swimming, if you have access to a pool


Back when I really cared about my PT levels, I used to do cross training in the morning, swim at lunch, and do a ruck run in the evening.
 

Jarnhamar

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I suppose I could add some rucking to my PT routine but honestly I feel like if you lift heavy, then ruck marches aren't a problem usually.

Let me know what you think about my PT and wether it's good prep for a recce course.

If you show up for a recce course in Petawawa without a strong foundation in rucking, you're done. 2x 5km runs per week won't strengthen your legs or toughen your feet up.
 
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