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Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship AOPS

Maxman1

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Has there been any murmurings about the naming scheme being looked at for the CCG AOPS? Any potential ideas?

Coast Guard ships are usually named after significant people. Being arctic patrol ships, they could be named after arctic explorers like George Beck or James Ross, or John Rae and John Richardson (there's already a CCGS John Franklin).
 

quadrapiper

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I disagree with you, with a little leg work, must of the FN bands will love it. Particularly some of the most modern and capable warships we have ever had. If fact I can see some competition to get the honour.
<drift>
On a somewhat related note, saw some discussion about order of precedence for indigenous flags (expect there's other carried signifiers once you get into traditional practices) on a Facebook group. Currently very much undefined, but someone needs to have a look at it, both from a TRC perspective and from a practical one: there's more movement by indigenous groups to take a public, visible role in civic ceremonial outside their own communities, and outside events with a solely indigenous focus.

Treaty-signing nations resident within Canada's borders and predating the provinces should have a place in the national ceremonial realm. Expect the tidiest would be nations' flags etc. being senior to everything except the Canadian flag, perhaps with a note that indigenous entities that correspond closely to the current "municipal" and "organization" classes will find their home accordingly.

Really wouldn't want to touch precedence among indigenous flags etc.
</drift>
 

Furniture

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I'm with @Colin Parkinson here, done right this could be actually meaningful and actually fully in line with the intent of the TRC.

Worthwhile things aren't usually easy. Safe is boring. If the RCN has enough time for moustache badges they have resources for this at HQ.
That's easy to say, but like with the coastal gaslink pipeline, which group do you engage with? What is the solution when the a few renegades stir up trouble and get the woke Twitter mob coming after the CAF/GoC? Is the juice worth the squeeze? Do you think the GoC wouldn't throw the RCN under the bus to save face?

There is a fine line between brave and stupid, and I suspect we draw that line slightly differently on this topic.

Rivers and provinces are an established, historic, and safe way to proceed.
 

lenaitch

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<drift>
On a somewhat related note, saw some discussion about order of precedence for indigenous flags (expect there's other carried signifiers once you get into traditional practices) on a Facebook group. Currently very much undefined, but someone needs to have a look at it, both from a TRC perspective and from a practical one: there's more movement by indigenous groups to take a public, visible role in civic ceremonial outside their own communities, and outside events with a solely indigenous focus.

Treaty-signing nations resident within Canada's borders and predating the provinces should have a place in the national ceremonial realm. Expect the tidiest would be nations' flags etc. being senior to everything except the Canadian flag, perhaps with a note that indigenous entities that correspond closely to the current "municipal" and "organization" classes will find their home accordingly.

Really wouldn't want to touch precedence among indigenous flags etc.
</drift>
Is there any evidence of flags, banners or other manner of symbology that was inherent to the indigenous cultures, or is that a form of appropriation of western ('settler') culture? I'm not saying it's a completely bad idea, but I get the sense that any of the flags that I have seen (Mohawk, Warrior & Metis come to mind) seem to be fairly recent adoptions.
 

Maxman1

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I'm with @Colin Parkinson here, done right this could be actually meaningful and actually fully in line with the intent of the TRC.

Worthwhile things aren't usually easy. Safe is boring. If the RCN has enough time for moustache badges they have resources for this at HQ.

Considering the government made Truth and Reconciliation Day a holiday for government workers, then skipped out on a ceremony to go surfing, that may be asking for more than they can give at this time.
 

Navy_Pete

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That's easy to say, but like with the coastal gaslink pipeline, which group do you engage with? What is the solution when the a few renegades stir up trouble and get the woke Twitter mob coming after the CAF/GoC? Is the juice worth the squeeze? Do you think the GoC wouldn't throw the RCN under the bus to save face?

There is a fine line between brave and stupid, and I suspect we draw that line slightly differently on this topic.

Rivers and provinces are an established, historic, and safe way to proceed.
Sure, but worth a go. If it stirs up strong/mixed feelings it's at least worth a try. Worse case you get a 'no', best case you can do something cool, and get some sweet ship's crests with even cooler SWAG, with a genuinely good reason for some TD to keep the relationSHIP going (because that's part of the NSS for the different 'SHIPS' we build... heard that enough it's left mental scars).

I expect we won't bother though, and instead just issue more ugly pins for meaningless career benchmarks.
 

Czech_pivo

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Coast Guard ships are usually named after significant people. Being arctic patrol ships, they could be named after arctic explorers like George Beck or James Ross, or John Rae and John Richardson (there's already a CCGS John Franklin).
I'm only suggesting this half in jest and half in seriousness.

CCG Brian Mulroney and CCG David Suzuki

Both have been champions of the environment in Canada, both have been recognised as such. Though not specifically Arctic related, they both have done significant things in bettering the 'green' health/awareness in Canada.

Yes, both are currently living and I'm sure there is some traditional reasons not to name the vessels after them as long as they are both living, but in today's Canada, traditions mean little.

Ok, go ahead and start flinging your rocks at my glass house. :)
 

Mike5

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I'm only suggesting this half in jest and half in seriousness.

CCG Brian Mulroney and CCG David Suzuki

Both have been champions of the environment in Canada, both have been recognised as such. Though not specifically Arctic related, they both have done significant things in bettering the 'green' health/awareness in Canada.

Yes, both are currently living and I'm sure there is some traditional reasons not to name the vessels after them as long as they are both living, but in today's Canada, traditions mean little.

Ok, go ahead and start flinging your rocks at my glass house. :)

I saw former Prime Minister Mulroney speak at an event several years ago, before the pandemic. I'm a Liberal but I thought he was funny, well-spoken and articulate. He did a lot for Canada, not least the investment in the Halifax-class frigates.

The Americans don't have a problem naming major vessels after former Presidents ... but (CCG aside) it does not seem to be a tradition in the Commonwealth?
 

Spencer100

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I saw former Prime Minister Mulroney speak at an event several years ago, before the pandemic. I'm a Liberal but I thought he was funny, well-spoken and articulate. He did a lot for Canada, not least the investment in the Halifax-class frigates.

The Americans don't have a problem naming major vessels after former Presidents ... but (CCG aside) it does not seem to be a tradition in the Commonwealth?
Because being sunk by the HMS Pansy vs the USS Jimmy Carter is more devastating.....on second thought :)
 

BdaDug

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In a related note, there was a lot of Inuit that were for the 'Edmonton Eskimo' name, as it was one of the few high profile things for their culture. The older generation didn't necessarily have the same negative connotation with the name, but that was all erased when they went the safe route, vice working with Inuit/Inuk folks to transition the name.

Which is really a shame, because if you want to meet a tough bunch of (really friendly and unassuming) people to name a team after, they are awesome. I'm sure they could have come up with an appropriate mascot (Caribou? Polar bear? Narwhale?) but that was a weak way out
 
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